What’s The Ethical Stance On Abortion?

BY RACHEL DIMAURO, Staff Writer

Since Roe vs. Wade, abortion has been one of the most debated, deliberated, and discussed topics in today’s society.

The morality, women’s rights, right vs. wrong, pro-life vs. pro-choice and every other concern has been canvassed.

Most arguments surrounding abortion usually focus on the law aspect of the topic, and whether or not it should be illegal or legal.

Instead of playing volleyball with the two sides, I would like to look at abortion from a strictly ethical viewpoint.

Many debates surrounding abortion focus on one thing: whether or not it is morally right to terminate a pregnancy before the full duration has passed.

Now, to better understand what each side thinks, and to come to a decision and/or conclusion based solely on ethics, let’s examine exactly what it means to be pro-life or pro-choice.

Pro-choice supporters argue that is it a women’s right to decide what is done with her body, as opposed to pro-life enthusiasts, who are of the opinion that it is immoral to end a life simply because it is “your choice” to do so.

There is, however, somewhat of a dispute in regards to what is actually considered to be a living fetus. Pro-life supporters would argue that life beings at conception—point blank.

In comparison, most pro-choice advocates believe that a fetus only becomes human, or alive, at 26 weeks. But, if life doesn’t begin at conception, then there must be a point when these bundles of cells that we call fetus’ become humans.

Pro- choice advocates will even admit that there is a point when fetus’ cease to be (not alive, shall we say?), the question is: when is this point?  This point, many would argue, doesn’t exist.

Humans are constantly changing and rearranging to becoming different (even if it’s a minute change) versions of themselves—during these changes, do they cease to be human?

An article by Quora.com, used an interesting analogy by using the colors red and yellow, it stated that, “This is red. This is yellow. These are, obviously, very different colors. If red is not yellow (it isn’t), then there must be a point where a color actually makes the transition from red to yellow. Where is that point? I’m being ridiculous, of course. We all know the correct answer here: There is no “point” where red becomes yellow. It gradually does.”

This could be used for a developing fetus as well.

There is no “point” in which a fetus is officially a human. It has always been one, it just gradually grows into a complete life form at the end of nine months. But, that does not mean that at one stage along the way that it ceased to be alive.

If a woman has consented to have relations, and has not taken the proper steps to ensure that there is not pregnancy as a result, then that woman knows that being pregnant and having a child might be a result of that action. If a woman then chooses to get an abortion, does that woman not hold some form of ethical obligation to not terminate a living organism?

Now what about the child itself—there is some conflict pertaining to the rights and choice of that child.

If there is an argument that a woman should have the choice over her body, then it follows that there is an argument that she is making that choice not just for her, but also for the growing fetus inside of her.

Whether you believe that a fetus is a human or not, you’re still, making a conscious decision that that life (or potential life) inside of you doesn’t need to exist.

To put it in context, think of it this way: if you are 15, and your mother decides that she doesn’t want to have children anymore, is she ethically right to end your life merely because she decided she doesn’t want you?

If the action is wrong when the child is older, then what makes it acceptable when the child is in utero?

In our society, regardless of your religious, political or social views, we all have an underlying code or principal of what is right and wrong. If we step over the boundaries of that code, and break the morality and ethicality that is interwoven into our society, then we are tearing at the equilibrium and balance that helps keep our society stable.

Everyday Inventions Hidden In Plain Sight

BY AHMAD GRAVES-EL, Staff Writer

To paraphrase Hip Hop Lyricist Emeritus Krs-One, “African-American History is the world’s history.”

Before I go any further, I must inform the readers, this is not a Black History Month article. This is a mini-history lesson. However, before I move on to the subject at hand, I will acknowledge that a certain segment of citizens in our country chafe at the mere mention of the phrase “Black History Month.” Here is an example of why African-American achievements are hallmarked in the month February:

On February 1, President Donald Trump held a press conference dubbed the “African-American History Month ‘listening session.’” In speaking about several American icons including Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and Harriet Tubman, (future face of the $20 bill), Trump made an overtly obtuse comment regarding Frederick Douglass. “Frederick Douglass is an example of someone who’s done an amazing job and is being recognized more and more, I notice,” President Trump said.

Yes, Douglass, who courageously escaped from the hellish bowels of slavery, was a pre-eminent scholar, orator, abolitionist, and occasional counselor to Abraham Lincoln, while becoming one of the leading citizens in American history. However, Douglass has been dead for 122 years.

If one didn’t know better, one could reasonably infer, through President Trump’s statement that Douglass was still walking the Earth, “abolitioning.” Uninformed remarks such as these are one reason why there is a Black History Month.

However, this article is not about black history—it is about world history. This article will shed some light on this topic for our readers who have been inconceivably kept in the dark regarding the accomplishments of several “Hidden Figures”; African-American inventors whose brilliant inventions continue to leave a positive and lasting impact on human beings throughout the world.

Millions of people have heard of the term, “The Real McCoy,”—which means the genuine article. Many don’t know that, that phrase came into existence because of an object created by African-American inventor Elijah McCoy.

According to biography.com, McCoy (1843-1929) was the son of runaway slaves from Kentucky, who escaped to Canada, and later became a master mechanic by studying mechanical engineering in Scotland.

In the 1800s, railroads were the major means of transport—whether it was humans or products—across the U.S. The ride was rarely smooth because the engines in the locomotives would heat up rapidly, causing them to make frequent pit stops. While at rest, an engineer would squirt oil on the engine to help it cool off, so the train could continue its journey.

As you can imagine, the intermittent stops kept people and products from getting to their desired destination in a timely fashion, and to many—-time is money.

Understanding this, McCoy invented an automatic lubrication device that was patented in 1872 as an “Improvement in Lubricators for Steam Engines.”

“McCoy’s invention was a small thing,” wrote Aaron E. Klein in his book, The Hidden Contributors: Black Scientists and Inventors in America, “but it speeded up the railroads and faster railroad deliveries spurred the economic growth of a nation.”

After McCoy’s invention, numerous imitators arose with their own version of the lubricator; but none were comparable to the ingenious efficiency of the original. Thus, when people wanted to purchase an automated lubricator, they wanted nothing less than “The Real McCoy.” This term that is still prevalent in the American lexicon today.

McCoy also invented the folding ironing board and the lawn sprinkler.

In 1923, Garret A. Morgan invented something that most of us would agree we couldn’t live without. The three-way traffic light is the brainchild of this African-American inventor.

According to Patricia Carter Sluby, author of “The Inventive Spirit of African-Americans: Patented Ingenuity,” after witnessing a fatal accident between a horse drawn carriage and a car, Morgan visualized that it was a good idea to use illuminated colored lights visible during the day and at night, to control vehicular traffic at intersection…” Hence, the three-way traffic signal was born.

Although there is no way it can completely stop car accidents, there is also no way to count the innumerable lives that have been saved by Morgan’s bright invention.

African-American inventors have left a profound and indelible mark on the lives of billions of people across planet Earth. Unfortunately, there has been a long-standing systematic scheme to keep pertinent facts out of certain history books to purposely keep the masses in the dark.

It is now time to enter the light and become aware that “African-American History is your history.”

Ajit Pai: Friend Or Foe To Net Neutrality?

BY RACHEL DIMAURO, Staff Writer

Net neutrality has been a highly debated topic since the Federal Communications Commission (FCC) first introduced the neutrality rules back in 2015. The goal of the rules is to prevent Internet service providers from blocking, regulating, discriminating, or monitoring internet traffic—in short, it is to prevent any one person, or company from having complete control over the Internet, or to prevent a company from acting in a way that would place other companies at a disadvantage.

With the new Trump administration recently taking office, one of the concerns of Congress—and Democrats as a whole—is Trump’s pick of Ajit Pai for Chairman of the FCC. Pai, is said to have been a straight-A student in telecom law, and is a former Verizon lawyer.

Pai served as a minority Republican member for the past three years, before being elevated to the position of chairman by President Trump. He is said to be strong-minded on conservative interpretations of telecommunications law, and the limits of the FCC’s power. He stated that he is trying to clean the slate for a fresh new start, but many fear that that means he will advocate eliminating the rules entirely. Previous statements show that their speculations might be in vain. Pai was quoted saying, “Americans love the free and open Internet. We relish our freedom to speak, to post, to rally, to learn, to listen, to watch, and to connect online.”

So what does this mean? What is the future of net neutrality under the Trump administration? Since being in office for just a few weeks, he has already made efforts to alter what the former Obama administration had set in place. He started by withdrawing an effort to keep prison phone rates down—which isn’t a terrible idea, however, many argued that charging over a $1 per minute for phone time in prisons was a bit extreme. He nixed a proposal to break open the cable box market, as well as stopping nine companies from providing discounted high-speed Internet service to low income families. Pai released around a dozen actions of the previous administration.

The media has been a roller-coaster ride of opinions as to whether Pai will end up being a decant choice or an undesirable one. One day the sentiment is positive, and the next it’s negative. In a recent article written by Forbes, they stated, “. . . Other reporters suggest that, while he is not friendly to big government, he is a very pragmatic “lawyer of lawyers” who advocates free markets and competition.”

What can explain these bipolar views? Part of the problem is the complexity of the actual net neutrality rules. The 400-page Open Internet Order that was implemented in 2015 has two components. One is regarding net neutrality in its capacity of forbidding Internet and wireless providers from censoring content over competing networks. The other is to regulate the Internet as a public utility.

In the same article by Forbes, they said that, “Pai has shown a clear inclination against regulating broadband internet service as a utility, arguing potential government over-reach and over- regulation of internet and wireless providers like Comcast or AT&T. But that doesn’t mean that he is an enemy of a neutral internet.”

His statements have been used against him to conclude that he will abolish the net neutrality rules—even though the two are very different things.

To obtain a clear answer as to whether or not Pai will succeed in abolishing net neutrality, or bettering it, I fear at this moment is nigh on impossible. This early on, it is entirely true, that only time will tell.

When I was your age…

By Makinzi Hinkle

Staff Writer

We’ve all heard our grandparents or parents say that when they were our age everything was different. Their lives were different and so was technology. They didn’t have the newest iPhone or even an iPad because, obviously, they weren’t around. Even the 90s babies didn’t have technology at a young age. When we were younger, we played outside instead of staying inside to play on our phones. When we rode our bikes, we knew where our “squad” was by how many bikes were in the front yard. If we had the technology we have today back then, we would miss out on family time and so much more. Also, technology has come in between relationships. Whether its sliding into a girls DM’s or snapchatting each other to the point where you become best friends, technology has come in the middle of almost every relationship. Have you ever thought about how technology has really changed the way we live? According to babble.com, here are seven examples:

  1. Technology has killed the greeting card
    1. We are no longer paying postage to send out birthday cards. It has turned into posting a “happy birthday” on Facebook or its sent over text.
  2. How we date
    1. Even though online dating has been around for ages, many people are using Google to see if their date has a record.
  3. How we share
    1. We aren’t sharing information like we used to. Instead of saying it face-to- face, we are using our social media accounts to post the news.
  4. How we watch TV
    1. We can now download apps to put on our smartphones to watch MTV, Lifetime, Netflix, etc. anywhere and anytime.
  5. How we communicate
    1. Instead of picking up the phone and seeing if your friend(s) and family are available, we are using our smartphones to text them.
  6. How we read
    1. Paperbacks are now available our tablets and smartphones. They have made it easier to carry the books we enjoy reading and we can bring them anywhere we would like.
  7. How we parent
    1. Parents have to teach their children “digital etiquette” and they warn them about what is online.

Technology has affected relationships in a big way. For example, Snapchat had a feature where you could tell who was best friends with your boyfriend/girlfriend. That caused drama to happen and it usually ended up with a breakup. Other than Snapchat, Twitter comes in affect. People subtweet, slide into each others DM’s, favoriting each others tweets, etc. With Instagram, guys would like other girl’s pictures. Then, they would try to slide into their DM. If they are already in a relationship, the girl would think that he is cheating on her and usually that causes problems. Along with Snapchat, Twitter and Instagram, at a point of time, Apple had an update where you were able to see who your boyfriend/girlfriend recently texted. Even if they delete the messages, if you double-clicked the home button and all of the recent people they talked to were right on the top of the apps you had open.

Technology has changed over the years. Our grandparents and parents always would say that when they were our age, they didn’t have the technology we have today. 90s babies didn’t have a hold of technology until the middle 2000’s and technology has now come to the point of ruining couple’s relationships.

Democratic Race

Democratic Race

 

On Tuesday night beat Clinton in West Virginia. Sanders’ victory serves as a huge reminder to Clinton that despite, her upcoming showdown with the most likely Republican nominee Donald Trump, Clinton has yet to formally wrap up her own party’s presidential nomination.

“Sanders’ victory in one of the poorest states in America, was anchored in his message that the economy is rigged against working Americans. Exit poll data showed that 61% of Democratic primary voters were very worried about the state of the economy, and 55% of that group voted for Sanders. He also beat Clinton among women 52% to 38% and also among independents’, nearly 40 percentage points” (cnn.com).

Many things have changed for Clinton. About eight years ago, West Virginia helped her in the same way it aided Sanders on Tuesday. Clinton received a huge victory in the primary over Barack Obama that boosted her morale even if it wasn’t enough to change the basic delegates math that made it very impossible for her to win the nomination.

“This time, around, Clinton faced difficulties of her own making in West Virginia after saying in a March CNN town hall meeting in Ohio that she was going to put a “lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business” with her policies on climate change” (cnn.com).

Next, if Clinton wants to win the Democratic Party she has to step up and finishing the race strong, because Sanders isn’t going away anytime soon. Sanders seems very determined to keep on trying his best to beat Clinton and win the delegates. Therefore Clinton shouldn’t be looking ahead to taking on Trump yet. Clinton has to make sure she defeats Sanders first, and than she can look ahead to taking on Trump. Trump on the other hand doesn’t seem to care about which Democratic he takes on.

 

Democratic Race

 

On Tuesday night beat Clinton in West Virginia. Sanders’ victory serves as a huge reminder to Clinton that despite, her upcoming showdown with the most likely Republican nominee Donald Trump, Clinton has yet to formally wrap up her own party’s presidential nomination.

“Sanders’ victory in one of the poorest states in America, was anchored in his message that the economy is rigged against working Americans. Exit poll data showed that 61% of Democratic primary voters were very worried about the state of the economy, and 55% of that group voted for Sanders. He also beat Clinton among women 52% to 38% and also among independents’, nearly 40 percentage points” (cnn.com).

Many things have changed for Clinton. About eight years ago, West Virginia helped her in the same way it aided Sanders on Tuesday. Clinton received a huge victory in the primary over Barack Obama that boosted her morale even if it wasn’t enough to change the basic delegates math that made it very impossible for her to win the nomination.

“This time, around, Clinton faced difficulties of her own making in West Virginia after saying in a March CNN town hall meeting in Ohio that she was going to put a “lot of coal miners and coal companies out of business” with her policies on climate change” (cnn.com).

Next, if Clinton wants to win the Democratic Party she has to step up and finishing the race strong, because Sanders isn’t going away anytime soon. Sanders seems very determined to keep on trying his best to beat Clinton and win the delegates. Therefore Clinton shouldn’t be looking ahead to taking on Trump yet. Clinton has to make sure she defeats Sanders first, and than she can look ahead to taking on Trump. Trump on the other hand doesn’t seem to care about which Democratic he takes on.

 

4 Woman writers to check out this summer

By KYLEE BAGLEY

Here are four award-winning ladies who are challenging the literary world with their courageous stories, denouncing the stereotypical view of female authors. Alysia Harris, Nicole Krauss, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Andrea Gibson are four authors you do not want to miss.

Alysia Harris is a renowned spoken-word poet and former member of the performance collective, The Strivers Row. Alysiaharris.com tells readers she has performed in seven countries and as part of the winning teams in the 2007 CUPSI and Brave New Voices competitions. Her lines evoke emotional response; “Hoes, boppers, and skanks. What’s in a name, but a whole lot of rape culture?” Harris meshes elegance, honesty, grit, and current culture to bring her poems to life. Her newly published chapbook, How Much We Must Have Looked like Stars to Stars, is already award-winning and highly coveted by fans.

Nicole Krauss has been named by The New York Times as “one of America’s most important novelists.” Her internationally best-selling books have been translated into 35 languages and her novels Great House, The History of Love, and Man Walks into a Room, have all won or been finalists for numerous awards. In 2010, Krauss was chosen by The New Yorker for their “20 under 40” list. She proves herself worthy of her laudable title with her intricately woven and always surprising stories. Krauss’ books share common themes such as memory, how people recover from great losses, and exploration of the inner self.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a Nigerian author and winner of multiple awards, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction. She has written three novels, Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah, and myriad short stories. Her compelling novels tackle issues dealt with by her own people such as political instability and the Nigerian Civil War, as well as love and personal unrest. She is a celebrated TED speaker and feminist; a woman who, according to an interview with The Guardian, “doesn’t seek to upset critics, but does so willingly if that’s what it takes.”

Andrea Gibson is a spoken-word poet and activist for gender and LGBTQ issues who prefers to use they/their pronouns rather than she/he. They have six published works including The Madness Vase and their latest book, Pansy. Andreagibson.org shares Gibson was the first winner of the Women’s World Poetry Slam. In an interview with dailycal.org, Gibson tells that they prefer to write and perform collaboratively with musicians. Gibson is raw and truthful in both their poetry and activism. They write about weighted issues such as rape, gender norms, war, and bullying as a way to start a dialogue that so many people try to avoid.

With their honest depictions of life from the woman’s point of view, these authors and poets are not afraid to speak for themselves and countless others who seek to change female writing into a truthful discussion instead of the usual frills.