F-U-N-D-I-N-G, find out what it means to CCC

By Sarah Galzerano

On Monday, March 14, a designated group of Cumberland County College students took a trip to Trenton to visit the statehouse; but this was not your average visit. This group of students – Samantha Cocove, Georgia Salvaryn, Anthony Chesebro, Rachel DiMauro, Terron Mitchell-Green, and myself – attended an annual state-sanctioned event with Kellie Slade, Executive Director of Student Activities and Leadership, called Community College Lobby Day. The purpose of this event is to give college students, whom are active in their school community, the chance to express their hopes and concerns to state assemblymen about underfunding.

CCC sat beside New Jersey’s 18 sibling community colleges for their second time early Monday morning at the Wyndham Garden Hotel, where we were introduced and itineraries were reviewed. The walk to the statehouse was slippery, but the rain did not dampen our moods or our minds. We were privileged to meet with Assemblyman Adam J. Taliaferro, Assemblyman R. Bruce Land, and Assemblyman Bob Andrzejczak, and befriended our neighbors Salem County and Atlantic Cape County along the way.

After first thanking the Assemblymen, our personal stories, thoughts, and worries started to flow. Some of the concerns that were discussed were the decreasing graduation rates throughout the state, the percentage of poverty specifically in our county, the expansion of NJ STARS to transfer students, the important “transition” ability a community college can provide, the blatant unaffordability of 4 year schools, the opportunity to start more bachelor programs at community colleges, the unfair underfunding of community colleges in comparison to universities, and the overall importance of receiving an education to benefit our nation’s future.

CCC freshman and education major, Samantha Cocove was honored to attend Community College Lobby Day for her first time and says she looks forward to going again next year! Her biggest concern about the lack of funding for our community colleges is “it will affect the resources that help our students become successful – the lack of budget often reduces the number of available advisors, registrars, tutors, etc.” Cocove elaborates further by saying, “I’m worried about students becoming discouraged and leaving community college altogether.” If more funding was available to us, she would hope to see more student worker programs. “This would benefit students by providing them with valuable work-related experience such as communication, customer service skills, organizational skills, and much more.”

I too am worried that students are rapidly becoming discouraged. As a student leader and active participant in Phi Theta Kappa’s C4 Initiative campaign for the past two years, I have noticed determination dwindling down to nothing. When you ask students if they’re committed to graduating, they hesitate to answer. Do you find community college important?

If you’re interested in attending Community College Lobby Day next year, contact the Student Life and Activities Office. Fight for your right for fair funding.

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Get your hands dirty at Pottery Boot Camp

By KYLEE BAGLEY

For anyone who is interested in honing in on their crafting skills, it’s not too late to sign up for spring classes at CCC’s Clay College! Located on High Street in Millville, the Clay College offers noncredit classes to anyone interested, student or not. Annual pottery classes of multiple levels are offered in the spring including: Intro to Pottery, Advanced Pottery for Adults, and Intro to Pottery Wheel. Pottery Boot Camp will be available for the first time this spring. Whatever your skill level is, you will be able to find your niche at the Clay College.

Intro to Pottery classes run from May 23 to June 27 on Monday evenings, 6-9 PM. It costs $135 to register with no previous experience needed. According to flyers advertising the courses, “[Intro to Pottery] explores hand-building techniques such as pinch, coil and slab, and throwing on the pottery wheel. Glaze, firings, and studio access are including in this six-week class.” This class is best for people that want to begin learning the craft or are just looking for a creative activity to try.

Advanced Pottery for Adults begins on May 18 and winds down on June 29. Classes are from 6-9 PM on Wednesdays and costs $190 total. “It is a seven-week course is for the more advanced student who already has some knowledge of creating pottery. Ceramic processes and techniques will be covered while developing student’s individual work.” Clay College will provide some of the necessary materials, but TBD materials will be up to the students to obtain themselves.

Intro to Pottery Wheel is another beginner’s class, but this one focuses solely on pottery made on a wheel rather than hand crafted items. This class runs from May 31 to June 28 on Tuesday’s from 6-9 PM. Classes cost $135. As advertised, “students will learn through weekly demonstrations and hands-on instruction how to make basic forms on the wheel.”

Pottery Boot Camp is the Clay College’s newest class. It is a four-week intensive class that teaches beginning hand-building techniques and a quick lesson on the wheel. This class is ideal for people who don’t have the time to commit to a regular class. However, it is limited to 10 available spots for prospective students. This class takes place on Saturday’s from 1-4 PM between April 30 and May 21. It is the least expensive of the classes, costing only $125.

As an added bonus, participants will receive two months of studio time during the months of July and August for absolutely free, along with their purchase of any of the classes provided. To gain more information or sign up for a class, visit http://www.claycollege.com.

CCC’s 2016 Commencement Speaker

CCC’s 2016 Commencement Speaker

By Jenn Hallgren

On May 19, Cumberland County College graduates and the community will be addressed at commencement by this year’s keynote speaker, CEO of Wawa, Chris Gheysens. Before becoming the head of the flock, Gheysens grew up in Vineland and worked at his father’s carwash while attending local schools such as St. Mary’s in East Vineland and St. Augustine Preparatory in Richland, NJ.

He then went across the river to earn a Bachelor’s of Science in Accounting from Villanova University and later went on to earn his Master’s of Business Administration at Saint Joseph’s University in Philadelphia. “I have a fondness for Villanova and St. Joe’s,” Gheysens told Mainline Today in a 2013 interview, “They helped shape who I am in a lot of ways.”

Gheysens became the Chief Executive Officer for Wawa in 2013. He began his career with Wawa in 1997 as its Chief Financial and Administrative Officer and went on to become the President in 2012. Gheysens told Nj.com, “South Jersey is a big part of Wawa, and it is definitely a part of me.”

As CCC approaches their 50th anniversary, Wawa will have celebrated 52 years of service on Wawa Day, which is on April 16. The founding family of Wawa, the Woods family, donated the land on which CCC was built and still owns half of the company.

During a press release announcing Gheysens as the keynote speaker for this year’s commencement, interim president Shelly Schneider stated, “Mr. Gheysens and Wawa are two great Cumberland County success stories, a great inspiration for our new graduates and the community.”

Although his footprint covers 645 stores across the tri-state area, Maryland, Virginia, and now central Florida, Gheysens still calls New Jersey his home—South Jersey actually—and enjoys visiting the Jersey Shore with his wife, Patricia Gheysens, and four children. “I grew up in South Jersey, spent my summers in Sea Isle,” Gheysens told Philly Magazine in 2012 when he was about to take the “lead goose” position replacing then CEO Howard Stoeckel. Just as South Jersey is loyal to Wawa, Wawa is loyal to South Jersey.

Commencement will be held at Cumberland County College on May 19 at 6PM and is open to the public.

4 Woman writers to check out this summer

By KYLEE BAGLEY

Here are four award-winning ladies who are challenging the literary world with their courageous stories, denouncing the stereotypical view of female authors. Alysia Harris, Nicole Krauss, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, and Andrea Gibson are four authors you do not want to miss.

Alysia Harris is a renowned spoken-word poet and former member of the performance collective, The Strivers Row. Alysiaharris.com tells readers she has performed in seven countries and as part of the winning teams in the 2007 CUPSI and Brave New Voices competitions. Her lines evoke emotional response; “Hoes, boppers, and skanks. What’s in a name, but a whole lot of rape culture?” Harris meshes elegance, honesty, grit, and current culture to bring her poems to life. Her newly published chapbook, How Much We Must Have Looked like Stars to Stars, is already award-winning and highly coveted by fans.

Nicole Krauss has been named by The New York Times as “one of America’s most important novelists.” Her internationally best-selling books have been translated into 35 languages and her novels Great House, The History of Love, and Man Walks into a Room, have all won or been finalists for numerous awards. In 2010, Krauss was chosen by The New Yorker for their “20 under 40” list. She proves herself worthy of her laudable title with her intricately woven and always surprising stories. Krauss’ books share common themes such as memory, how people recover from great losses, and exploration of the inner self.

Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie is a Nigerian author and winner of multiple awards, including the Orange Broadband Prize for Fiction. She has written three novels, Purple Hibiscus, Half of a Yellow Sun, and Americanah, and myriad short stories. Her compelling novels tackle issues dealt with by her own people such as political instability and the Nigerian Civil War, as well as love and personal unrest. She is a celebrated TED speaker and feminist; a woman who, according to an interview with The Guardian, “doesn’t seek to upset critics, but does so willingly if that’s what it takes.”

Andrea Gibson is a spoken-word poet and activist for gender and LGBTQ issues who prefers to use they/their pronouns rather than she/he. They have six published works including The Madness Vase and their latest book, Pansy. Andreagibson.org shares Gibson was the first winner of the Women’s World Poetry Slam. In an interview with dailycal.org, Gibson tells that they prefer to write and perform collaboratively with musicians. Gibson is raw and truthful in both their poetry and activism. They write about weighted issues such as rape, gender norms, war, and bullying as a way to start a dialogue that so many people try to avoid.

With their honest depictions of life from the woman’s point of view, these authors and poets are not afraid to speak for themselves and countless others who seek to change female writing into a truthful discussion instead of the usual frills.

Are you anti-college?

By KYLEE BAGLEY

Staff Writer

The notion that traditional college is not for everyone is rapidly becoming part of mainstream society, but what about the idea of an anti-college? Anti-college is the opposite of traditional schooling, yet still higher education nonetheless. There are many people who believe this type of schooling is more beneficial for prospective students, but due to the short amount of time anti-schooling has been in effect, it is hard to know whether or not it truly is a better way to handle education.

In 2012, the Make School was founded on the idea of allowing students to learn and create without the pressure of grades and tuition fees. The only one of its kind, Make School has become a prototype of experiential learning with eyes heavily watching to see whether it will succeed or flounder.

Advocates for Make School and budding replications include the founders of PayPal, Virgin Airlines, and EBay. These are all people who didn’t go to college, or they themselves have dropped out. CCC’s Professor Kevin McGarvey thinks that these founders and geniuses like them are more readily available to support nontraditional ventures like Make School seeing as they flourished in this type of environment and felt that they didn’t need college.

Make School was co-founded by Jeremy Rossman and Ashu Desai. According to HuffingtonPost.com, Rossman and Desai were high school friends who, after each spending a year at MIT and UCLA, respectively, decided to take a semester off and explore the process of creating mobile apps. Rossman describes Make School as “a college replacement for founders and developers.”

MakeSchool.com reports they only have 50 spots to offer to prospective students each two-year program. There is only a 10 percent acceptance rate, but Make School is not for every major. The school specifically teaches classes in software engineering and computer sciences. According to McGarvey, “Make School is for people who are already at the top of their game. There are thousands of students who need the guidance a professor provides to point them in the right direction. Most people don’t just “know” these things; they have to be learned.”

What prospective students find so alluring is that Make School requires no upfront tuition. In a year where student loan debt is at 1.2 trillion in America (marketwatch.com) and the cost of tuition is at an all-time high, people are desperate to keep themselves out of monstrous debt. It is not until after graduating from Make School and acquiring a “career” that you are required to begin paying for your schooling. No official tuition rate has been released, but as stated on MakeSchool.com, students will pay 25% of their salary each year until the cost is covered.

Make School gives no grades. There are no tests or homework. Rather, they focus on project-based learning. Depending on the rapid advances in the technological world, students learn based on what is happening right now. In an interview with Seeker Stories, a YouTube channel that produces short documentaries, Rossman described their core philosophy: “…if you teach the same thing two years in a row, it has got to be wrong because computer science as a field and software engineering as a discipline are moving so fast.”

This new twist on education has raised the bar for effective learning, but McGarvey thinks colleges have nothing to fear. “Don’t count colleges out yet. Students learn to think critically; they discover ideas and concepts that hadn’t occurred to them before. They become individuals who can make rational decisions and think for themselves. For so many, college is a rite of passage into adulthood.”

There is no one right way for a person to learn, similar to the question students ask themselves, “Am I a visual learner? Auditory? Kinesthetic?” McGarvey stated, “The best and brightest rise to the top regardless. But that’s a small number of gifted people. Most of the rest need a push, a nudge in the right direction, some moral support when things become overwhelming. Those are some of the things a college like Cumberland does best.” And it’s true. The best type of schooling for an individual is based solely on said individual’s personality.

Make School offers students another alternative to traditional school. With diverse types of schooling popping up like this, it is clear to see that people are taking school seriously; something that can only cause our country to progress more rapidly.

Riker’s Island: Gaining freedom through self-expression

By KYLEE BAGLEY

Staff Writer

Riker’s Island is most known for being New York’s main jail complex and one of the world’s largest correctional institutions. Motherjones.com, a nonprofit news outlet, reports it as being one of America’s top ten worst prisons, but now, Riker’s Island is getting attention set in a whole new light. According to an interview with The New York Times, Miles Hodges, a spoken word poet and ambassador for the New York Public Library, has been developing a spoken word program at Riker’s over the past few months.

Hodges is currently working on two programs. The first being a spoken-word writing workshop for young women in their late teens and early twenties located in the Rose M. Singer Center, one of Riker’s nine functioning jails. The latter being performing his own hard hitting poems to inmates of the Eric M. Taylor Center, a male only jail.

You might be wondering what Hodges was thinking when implicating these workshops into the Riker’s Island culture, and it’s safe to say the inmates were too. After the initial indifference and lack of desire to attend, the male inmates were left with a new appreciation for the artistic medium.

Before beginning Hodges told inmates, “I’m a firm believer in the power of storytelling. I believe in its ability to change people’s minds. And I believe in being honest and speaking from a true and honest place.” Hodges’ goal in partnering with the New York Public Library is to create programs that entice the millennial generation to find and cultivate their voice in the form of creative outlet.

In an interview afterwards with The New York Times, Anthony Hernandez, an inmate serving several months for drug possession, said he had been reluctant to attend the program; he had expected it to be boring and stodgy. But he concluded, ‘It hit more like where you are from, a more different poetry.’”

At this specific visit that Hernandez attended, Hodges performed “Harlem,” arguably his best and most well known poem. In this poem, he describes the streets of Harlem as having, “Roached blunts and roached joints…scattered around the purple, pink, and black chalked R.I.P. signs as if whispering from the Concrete Jungle, ‘I’m resting in peace and high.’” These words resonate immensely with the inmates, most of whom spent their lives in the projects of New York before being incarcerated, and are used to the poverty, gang violence, and self-reliance that line the streets of so many urban cities across America.

Where some people make the mistake of dismissing poetry as being frilly and not relatable, Hodges reveals to inmates that poetry, specifically slam poetry, can be very raw and very real. In his collaborative poem, “Strive,” that he co-wrote and performs with Carvens Lissaint, Hodges makes his message to the Riker’s Island inmates clear: “Strive- Like you know prisons are man-made but minds are God-made.”

Eat Healthy On A Budget

SARAH GALZERANO
Staff Writer

Everyone always has the same excuse for not eating healthier -“It’s too expensive.” This point holds relevance for a lot of “broke” college students. Luckily, after doing some research, I may have found the answers to your excuses. The following tips will help you eat healthy while on a budget:

Buy Fresh Produce: Fresh produce is always great, but the price can really add up, especially when what you’re buying isn’t in season. Try buying fresh produce when it’s in season, stocking up on it, and freezing it. Another way to save money on produce is by hitting the farmers market at the end of the day. Depending on the store, you may be able to save money by going later.

Search for Sales: Don’t be afraid to be an “extreme couponer”. Your friends may laugh at you, but at least you won’t be broke. If your local grocery stores offer saving cards, be sure to sign up. Instead of shopping for what you plan to eat that week, plan to eat what is on sale.

Buy Frozen Vegetables: Don’t be afraid to buy frozen vegetables. They may not be as fresh as produce, but they are still healthy, and super affordable. According to a WebMD Expert Columnist, “Frozen vegetables come in 12-ounce to 24-ounce bags that cost anywhere from $1.75 to $2.25 and contain 6-8 cups, depending on the vegetable and the size of the bag.”

Buy Less Expensive Meat: You can still eat meat even when you’re on a tight budget, by looking for less expensive cuts of meat like chicken thighs instead of chicken breasts. Stores like Acme even do BOGO sales on meat. It also helps to buy the meat that is on sale in bulk and freeze it for future use.

Embrace whole grains and beans: Beans and whole grains are a cheap and healthy way to bulk up your meals, and they can even be a meal in themselves.

Prep Meals: If you have the time, planning and prepping your meals, no matter what the food is, is always a step in the right direction towards eating healthy. Plus, it’s a good way to make sure you’re eating what you already have in the fridge, instead of just stopping for snacks.

Stay Organized: If you keep an organized fridge and pantry, you’ll know exactly what you have to plan your meals and what you need to buy. Doing this also helps you to repurpose your leftovers, so they don’t get lost in the back of the fridge, and you can incorporate them into a new and delicious meal before they go bad.

Grow Your Own Food: Try gardening! Even if you don’t have a lot of yard space, it is still possible to grow a little bit of your own food.

Don’t Buy Drinks: If you’re trying to eat healthier in the first place, there’s no point in wasting money on a bunch of sugary drinks like soda and juice.

If you follow these tips on how to eat healthy on a budget, chances are you will save money in one more important area, because eating healthy will of course boost your immunity to illnesses – doctor’s bills!