The Soloist

 

Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey Jr. paint an intricate portrait of the developing friendship between L.A. Times journalist, Steve Lopez, and fragile musical genius Nathaniel Ayers.

Jamie Foxx and Robert Downey Jr. paint an intricate portrait of the developing friendship between L.A. Times journalist, Steve Lopez, and fragile musical genius Nathaniel Ayers.

 

 

By Saul Rosa
Staff Reporter

 

The Soloist is a film, all puns intended, for the heartstrings. It focuses on the development of the two main characters and their relationship rather than an intense plot with twists and turns. The journalistic style of Steve Lopez is present in the film, as it seems to be a series of events tied together with strong transitions, each being only a segment of the whole story. 

 The story opens with an introduction of the life and career as a news columnist for the L.A. Times of Steve Lopez, played by Robert Downey Jr.

 Lopez, searching for a subject for a new column, discovers a homeless man at Beethoven Square playing a violin that is missing all but two strings.

 Struck by the quality of the sound on such a poor instrument, Lopez addresses the homeless man as a potential news column. Mr. Lopez soon discovers that the homeless man is actually Nathaniel Ayres, played by Jamie Foxx, a dropout from the Juilliard School of Music.

 Intent on continuing his news columns, Lopez begins to help Nathaniel and the transition from news subject to friend begins.

 The scene changes tend to be followed by either a monologue by Steve Lopez or a piece of classical music.

 Nathaniel has a second chance at music, the one passion that keeps his mind stable, he was overcome many obstacles with the help of Lopez. Through his friendship with Nathaniel, Lopez rediscovers his passion for writing and reconnects with his family.

 Ultimately, the story of Nathaniel and Lopez is not an intensely driven story but a story of a series of events and how through these events a friendship emerged.

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